THE UPPER CRESCENT IN BELFAST

PART OF THE UPPER CRESCENT IS DERELICT

Last year I read, in a Belfast newspaper, that a developer had applied for permission to turn 14 to 16 Upper Crescent into 21 apartments. However, if you examine my photographs you will see a sign indicating that the buildings may be on the market.

One of the finest examples of Regency-style planning in Belfast, in the late 1800s Upper and Lower Crescent were home to Belfast city’s professionals who had moved to the South as town centre premises were being turned into retail outlets. Residents were attracted by the elegant three storey dwellings and close proximity to the bustling Queen’s College, which opened its doors in 1849.

It should be noted that the Lower Crescent is not curved despite the name.
IT IS DEPRESSING TO SEE THAT PART OF THE UPPER CRESCENT IS DERELICT 001
IT IS DEPRESSING TO SEE THAT PART OF THE UPPER CRESCENT IS DERELICT 001
IT IS DEPRESSING TO SEE THAT PART OF THE UPPER CRESCENT IS DERELICT 002
IT IS DEPRESSING TO SEE THAT PART OF THE UPPER CRESCENT IS DERELICT 002
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