LIBERTY HALL IN DUBLIN

Liberty Hall In Dublin City Centre

LIBERTY HALL IN DUBLIN CITY CENTRE AND THE DUBLIN SPIRE – I HAVE NEVER LIKED THIS BUILDING BUT I DO LIKE THE SPIRE

As you can see from the sky there was a lot of rain on the day that I took this photograph and I had to shelter for about an hour under the railway bridge.

Liberty Hall is the headquarters of the Services, Industrial, Professional, and Technical Union (SIPTU). Designed by Desmond Rea O’Kelly, it was formerly the tallest building in the state, at 59.4 metres, (195 feet) high until it was superseded by the County Hall outside Cork city, which was itself superseded by The Elysian in Cork. Liberty Hall is now the fourth tallest building in Dublin, after Capital Dock, Montevetro (now Google Docks) and the Millennium Tower in Grand Canal Dock.

Liberty Hall is more historically significant in its earlier form, as the headquarters of the Irish Transport and General Workers Union early in the 20th century, and also as the headquarters of the Irish Citizen Army (ICA).

In the late 1950s the original Liberty Hall was declared unsafe and promptly demolished.The present building, which has sixteen storeys, was constructed between 1961 and 1965. It was originally fitted with windows of non-reflective glass, but after they were damaged by a UVF car bomb on 1 December 1972 they were replaced with windows of reflective glass. The viewing platform, which had only recently been opened, was also closed after the car bomb. In October 2006 it was announced that SIPTU was seeking planning permission to demolish Liberty Hall and build a new 22 storey headquarters on the same site. In November 2012 the planning permission was overturned because it was deemed that the proposed building would be “unacceptably dominant in the city”.


Tags:

  • ‘Expression’ or Urban Expression is a Street Photography programme by William Murphy who operates under the name ‘Infomatique’ or ‘White-Cat’. Most kinds of portable camera are used for street photography but William has, over the years, switched from using large heavy DSLR cameras to light Mirrorless Cameras such as the Sony Alpha E-Mount range of cameras.

    By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

    The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

    Close